Previous Writing Competition Winners

 

2016 Winners

First Place: Kristin Giglia, “A Little Letter, A Big Difference: An Empirical Inquiry Into Possible Misuse of Schedule 13G/13D Filings” 116 Colum. L. Rev. 105 (2016).

Second Place: Kaitlin A. Bruno, “The Halfway Point Between Barbary Coast and Shangri-La: Extraterritoriality and the Viability of the Economic Reality Method” 65 AM. U. L. Rev. 435 (2015).

Third Place: Tara E. Levens, “Too Fast, Too Frequent? High-Frequency Trading and Securities Class Actions” 82 U. Chi. L. Rev. 1511 (2015).

 

2015 Winners

First Place: Derek Fischer, Dodd-Frank’s Failure to Address CFTC Oversight of Self-Regulatory Organization Rulemaking,” 115 Colum. L. Rev. 69 (2015).

Second Place: Christopher Napier, “Resurrecting Rule 14A-11: A Renewed Call For Federal Proxy Access Reform, Justifications and Suggested Revisions” (Rutgers University, School of Law).

Third Place: Lev Breydo, “Structural Foundations of Financial Stability: What Canada Can Teach America about Building a Better Regulatory System,” 17 U. Pa. J. Bus. L. (forthcoming).

 

2014 Winners

First Place: Alison B. Miller, Georgetown University Law Center, “Navigating the Disclosure Dilemma: Corporate Illegality and the Federal Securities Laws,” (to be published The Georgetown Law Review, June 2014).

Second Place: Anthony Sallah, University of Toledo College of Law, “Scheme Liability: Conduct Beyond the Misrepresentations, Descriptive Acts, and a Possible Janus Intervention,” (Published November 2013, University of Toledo Law Review).

Third Place: Matthew Aglialoro, Cornell Law School, “The Pleading Doctrine,” Published Cornell Law Review, Volume 99, Issue (November 2013).

 

2013 Winners

First Place: Alison B. Miller, Georgetown University Law Center, "Navigating the Disclosure Dilemma: Corporate Illegality and the Federal Securities Law," (to be published in The Georgetown Law Review, June 2014).

Second Place: Anthony Sallah, University of Toledo College of Law, "Scheme Liability: Conduct Beyond the Misrepresentations, Descriptive Acts, and a Possible Janus Intervention," (Published November 2013, University of Toledo Law Review).

Third Place: Matthew Aglialoro, Cornell Law School, "The New Pleading Doctrine," (Published November 2013, Cornell Law Review).